I just heard you groan. You’re thinking, But you just told me that dieting does not necessarily help me lose (or gain) weight. Yes, yes I did. Dieting does not help maintain healthy body weight. In fact, more and more research suggests that dieting actually harms your basal metabolic state, making you prone to regaining even more weight than you’ve lost and having a hard time losing it (again). (Please excuse the advertising at the end of the article linked. It’s the research surrounding Biggest Loser that fascinates me most. Here is also a great article by IDEA.)

 

So, the bad news is that yo-yo dieting can slow down your metabolism and a slow metabolism means that you are prone to working harder for fewer results. And then there are genes, which do account for a certain (if small) percentage toward whether or not we are naturally inclined toward thin or not-so-thin. But here is where the good news comes in!

 

Epigenetics. It’s a word most of us have never heard of before. Translated as “control above genetics,” this is the study of how environment plays a role in “turning on” and “turning off” our genes. Food is one of the main environmental factors we have in our lives and it perhaps plays one of the biggest roles in how our genes function (exercise being another main player).

 

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It seems that Hippocrates was right when he said, “Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.” Scientists have discovered that bioactive compounds like phytonutrients and antioxidants play a huge role in turning on genes that help us lose and maintain a healthy weight. Healthy lifestyle and diet choices can change the expression of at least 500 genes! This is great news for those of us who struggle with things like sugar addiction because it means that a wide, varying diet full of colorful fruits and vegetables nurtures your entire body right down to genetic expression. It means that you can start remaking yourself one bite (and one activity) at a time–and in 7-10 years, you’ll literally be a whole new person!

 

In my next post on this series, I’ll be sharing the small steps that I have been taking to help reduce my sugar cravings. I knew going in to this that it wasn’t going to be something that happened overnight, but I’m happy to say that I’m slowly seeing results. Looking forward to sharing more soon!

 

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Read the Whole Series here:

Part 1

Part 2

Matcha Tea

Right now I’m working on a couple things as far as minimizing sugar consumption and clean eating. I’m still in the process of figuring things out for myself as well as doing a bunch of research on food and the Western Diet. In doing so, I’ve come across a lot of dialogue concerning body size and health. While I’ve recognized these facts for some time, it is important that more people do also, so I thought I’d share them with you.

 

Myth: If I’m “fat”, I’m unhealthy.

Fact: Weight gain is caused by a myriad of factors, of which about 25% relates to genetics, and even more related to hormones (for women in particular). I have met women who struggle with losing weight who eat well and exercise daily, so one cannot judge just by surface appearance.

 

Myth: If I’m “skinny”, I’m healthy.

Fact: Skinny doesn’t mean a thing in the realm of healthy living. There are people who are thin as a rail who develop heart disease in their 20’s because they lead a sedentary life combined with poor dietary choices. I also know people who start to gain weight the minute they begin eating well and exercising regularly–indeed, this is one way to improve overall health for those who are  medically classified as underweight.

 

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Myth: If I diet, the weight will stay off.

Fact: Dieting is one of the leading causes of regaining weight–and regaining more weight than one previously weighed before beginning a diet! Most people who follow a standardized diet have one of two outcomes: either they have poor results because the diet does not work well for their body type, metabolism, and so forth; or they achieve their weight loss goals and stop dieting, only to regain it all back, plus some. Yo-yo dieting is not a solution to the problem. Exchanging healthy habits for unhealthy ones over a long period of time is.

 

Myth: If I exercise, the weight melts away.

Fact: There is a lot of truth to this statement, yet many people will find this more difficult than others due to a body’s initial homeostatic preferences, hormone- and disease-related issues, current dietary habits, sleep patterns, workplace stress factors, support in relationships (friendship, romance, parents, etc.), medications, mental health…the list can go on for pages.

 

Myth: If obesity runs in the family, there’s nothing I can do about it.

Fact: Genetics only make up about 25% of the picture, and a lot of what is perceived as hereditary actually comes back to the habits you learned as a child. Choices matter even when they don’t add up to the emaciated super-modelesque physique popular culture thrusts upon us each day. They matter a lot!

 

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Myth: If I’m obese when considering a proper diet and exercise regimen to begin, surgery is my only option.

Fact: Surgeries that help reduce weight rapidly should not be looked at as a permanent solution to the equation. For those who are morbidly obese, surgery is a starting point for your weight loss journey. The problem so many people find is that the moment they undo them, they gain back more weight than ever before. If surgery is something you are considering, you must discuss habitual lifestyle behaviors with your team of specialists (physician, registered dietitian, surgeon, personal trainer, therapist, etc.) in order to determine what steps you need to take are right for you. In my opinion, surgery is a last resort and only the first step to consistent, positive lifestyle habits.

 

The bottom line is if you’re having issues losing weight via “mainstream” diet and health guidelines, consulting your physician is a good place to start. Depending on your situation, you may need to work with a team of people that include a registered dietitian, personal trainer, psychologist, and other therapists. You should seek referrals from your doctor and anyone else you are currently working with in order to discover and tackle the issues you are facing, but at the end of the day, determination will win the day!

 

There is no one right kind of body shape. We are all created from a unique mold. Embrace your curves (or lack thereof) and think about why you are really here in this world. It isn’t to look amazing every single moment of every single day (not even Hollywood stars that do that). Utimately, it is to fulfill your purpose and live generously.

Sugar. I’ve talked about it before, sometimes at length. But it’s also my guilty little secret–I love sugar A LOT. And when I start eating it, I have a hard time stopping. It’s a vicious cycle and it’s one I really want to stop.

 

I had been thinking about the reality of sugar addiction and then I watched this video by a fellow Jamberry consultant, and decided it was time to talk about this in length:

 

 

Now, I’m not here to recommend a diet plan. If you are interested in something like the ketogenic diet, you should consult a registered dietitian. What I’m really here to discuss is the sad reality of the Western way of eating.

 

First and foremost, if you read labels when you go shopping, you almost always find sugar as a main ingredient in packaged and processed foods. It is well documented that sugar is addictive and in fact can be a replacement for drugs like cocaine. It has even been suggested that sugar addiction should be treated as a form of drug abuse. The change in behavior after eating sugar is undeniable. When my own children have sweets, they become much wilder, less able to entertain themselves, hungrier more frequently, and often less willing to follow household rules. I have found myself eating more food more frequently than I really need to on days that I have anything sweet–and I mean anything sweet.

 

Sugar is in everything. Take a look at this article. (I’m not recommending the services offered here. I just want you to look at how much sugar (in grams) there is per serving in some common foods.)

 

Here’s the kicker! For years, I’ve followed foodie blogs that tout using different alternatives to wheat and so forth because they’re considered healthier (and there’s good argument for the use of many of these alternative flours, oils, spices, etc.). I absolutely love desserts, so whenever one comes up, I look at it…but I had an epiphany this month: just because it uses healthier ingredients doesn’t meant it is any less sweet or less addictive. Let me just repeat myself one more time:

 

Just because it uses healthier ingredients doesn’t mean it is any LESS sweet or less addictive!

 

This is huge, because I think many people want to live healthier lifestyles. There’s huge talk about superfoods, gluten-free alternatives, stevia, bone broth, diets of all kinds…the list goes on and on. I think most who ascribe to a Western diet (and there are some major differences between it and Eastern and Mediterranean diets, which I’ll talk about at length in a later post), who struggle with their own growing midsections, increased inflammation in the body as a whole, heart disease and diabetes, malnutrition (yes, this can happen even if you’re consuming enough calories), and even negative mindset, anxiety and depression–in fact, most people in general–want to eat better. (Including myself! Hello, fellow sugar addicts!)

 

Herein lies the roots of the problem:

 

  1. We all lead extremely busy lives these days.
  2. Convenience foods, like those found in packages, are often quick, inexpensive, and last on the shelf for a long time. (Hint: if they have an expiration date that is longer than a few weeks, that should be a clue as to how “real” the food is.)
  3. Cooking can be hard work and it’s usually low on our daily to-do list. (I mean, let’s face it. Coming home dog tired to a refrigerator full of whole foods just doesn’t sound like fun some days, right? Instead, we say, “Where’s the pantry?”)
  4. Food is often used as a reward and during almost all celebrations and special events–this particularly applies to sweet, fatty, and salty foods.
  5. Uh, hello advertising! We love how convenient you tell us your products are.

 

I am on a journey. It’s going to be a really, really hard journey for me because I sincerely love sweets. However, I want to be healthy instead of filling my body up with junk. My body was created for a purpose–I was created for a purpose–and I need to take care of myself. I’m in my 30’s, I have children who look at everything I do (and they’re asking for sweets way too often), and I don’t want diseases that results from inflammation and weight gain to cripple me. Yes, I’m a yoga and Pilates instructor and shouldn’t all fitness instructors eat raw leaves and twigs and never even bat an eyelash at junk foods? No, sorry. We’re humans too, prone to indulging every so often. My problem is that I tend to indulge too often.

 

I hope you will join me in my quest for an easier way to eat without suffering from the constant hankering of a sweet tooth. I’m sure I’ll bumble, stumble, and rediscover a lot of amazing things along the way, and I look forward to sharing them here with the hope that my own thoughts help you become a better, healthier version of yourself.