The True Confessions of a Sugar Addict, Part 1: The Reality with Food

August 25, 2016

Sugar. I’ve talked about it before, sometimes at length. But it’s also my guilty little secret–I love sugar A LOT. And when I start eating it, I have a hard time stopping. It’s a vicious cycle and it’s one I really want to stop.

 

I had been thinking about the reality of sugar addiction and then I watched this video by a fellow Jamberry consultant, and decided it was time to talk about this in length:

 

 

Now, I’m not here to recommend a diet plan. If you are interested in something like the ketogenic diet, you should consult a registered dietitian. What I’m really here to discuss is the sad reality of the Western way of eating.

 

First and foremost, if you read labels when you go shopping, you almost always find sugar as a main ingredient in packaged and processed foods. It is well documented that sugar is addictive and in fact can be a replacement for drugs like cocaine. It has even been suggested that sugar addiction should be treated as a form of drug abuse. The change in behavior after eating sugar is undeniable. When my own children have sweets, they become much wilder, less able to entertain themselves, hungrier more frequently, and often less willing to follow household rules. I have found myself eating more food more frequently than I really need to on days that I have anything sweet–and I mean anything sweet.

 

Sugar is in everything. Take a look at this article. (I’m not recommending the services offered here. I just want you to look at how much sugar (in grams) there is per serving in some common foods.)

 

Here’s the kicker! For years, I’ve followed foodie blogs that tout using different alternatives to wheat and so forth because they’re considered healthier (and there’s good argument for the use of many of these alternative flours, oils, spices, etc.). I absolutely love desserts, so whenever one comes up, I look at it…but I had an epiphany this month: just because it uses healthier ingredients doesn’t meant it is any less sweet or less addictive. Let me just repeat myself one more time:

 

Just because it uses healthier ingredients doesn’t mean it is any LESS sweet or less addictive!

 

This is huge, because I think many people want to live healthier lifestyles. There’s huge talk about superfoods, gluten-free alternatives, stevia, bone broth, diets of all kinds…the list goes on and on. I think most who ascribe to a Western diet (and there are some major differences between it and Eastern and Mediterranean diets, which I’ll talk about at length in a later post), who struggle with their own growing midsections, increased inflammation in the body as a whole, heart disease and diabetes, malnutrition (yes, this can happen even if you’re consuming enough calories), and even negative mindset, anxiety and depression–in fact, most people in general–want to eat better. (Including myself! Hello, fellow sugar addicts!)

 

Herein lies the roots of the problem:

 

  1. We all lead extremely busy lives these days.
  2. Convenience foods, like those found in packages, are often quick, inexpensive, and last on the shelf for a long time. (Hint: if they have an expiration date that is longer than a few weeks, that should be a clue as to how “real” the food is.)
  3. Cooking can be hard work and it’s usually low on our daily to-do list. (I mean, let’s face it. Coming home dog tired to a refrigerator full of whole foods just doesn’t sound like fun some days, right? Instead, we say, “Where’s the pantry?”)
  4. Food is often used as a reward and during almost all celebrations and special events–this particularly applies to sweet, fatty, and salty foods.
  5. Uh, hello advertising! We love how convenient you tell us your products are.

 

I am on a journey. It’s going to be a really, really hard journey for me because I sincerely love sweets. However, I want to be healthy instead of filling my body up with junk. My body was created for a purpose–I was created for a purpose–and I need to take care of myself. I’m in my 30’s, I have children who look at everything I do (and they’re asking for sweets way too often), and I don’t want diseases that results from inflammation and weight gain to cripple me. Yes, I’m a yoga and Pilates instructor and shouldn’t all fitness instructors eat raw leaves and twigs and never even bat an eyelash at junk foods? No, sorry. We’re humans too, prone to indulging every so often. My problem is that I tend to indulge too often.

 

I hope you will join me in my quest for an easier way to eat without suffering from the constant hankering of a sweet tooth. I’m sure I’ll bumble, stumble, and rediscover a lot of amazing things along the way, and I look forward to sharing them here with the hope that my own thoughts help you become a better, healthier version of yourself.

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2 Responses to “The True Confessions of a Sugar Addict, Part 1: The Reality with Food”

  1. Deborah Turner said

    When I got diabetes, I had to watch carbs. There is a blessing in that. But my numbers weren’t falling fast enough. Wheat, potatoes, bread, pasta were cut down or eliminated. Okay, I can live with that. But finally I had to deal with sugar. Hard to do since I liked sweet coffee, and I’m a coffee addict. But I did it. I weaned myself down off the sugar and today I don’t like sweet coffee or tea.

    It can be done. We do have desserts, sometimes, but they are mostly fruit, sometimes cake, which we eat in small amounts and not every day. The point is that you don’t have to eliminate EVERY sweet, you just need to be disciplined. At the moment I have three different sorts of candy in my house (for low sugar moments), but I don’t even want them and when my sugar drops I forget I have them, so I have to be reminded.

    Your body craves sugar, but like any addiction, you can wean yourself from it. Doesn’t mean you can’t have any, ever, unless you choose that, but again, you have to be disciplined. Decide what you want and stick to it.

    Making your own food is the key. That way you KNOW what’s in it. Spices put the yum back into whole food. Trust me on this. I know you are exhausted, but the joy is in the preparing of the food for the family. Okay, that might sound African. It’s true though. It’s harder when the kids are whining and running about, but keep at it. It takes planning. You can do this. I have recipes.

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