Exercise, Personal Experience

Why Do Fitness Instructors Cost So Much?

I have been in the fitness industry for over eight years now and one of the things that never ceases to amaze me is how unwilling people are to pay for instructor services. I’ve talked to so many instructors over the years who tell me their client base finds it difficult to pay $25, $15, or even $5 for a class, let alone private lesson fees. We commiserate over the injustice of it all, but in reality it all simply comes down to a lack of customer knowledge about how the fitness industry works. So, I thought I’d break it down for you.

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First off, let me just take a moment to point out that in most cases, we as customers do not go to the cheapest places when we’re looking for a haircut, to get our nails done, have our cars worked on, and so forth. We want to pay for good quality services that we trust and that are backed by service guarantees. I mean, who wants to go to a hair stylist who won’t fix a goof-up? Or a mechanic who won’t at least let you know that your car is leaking when you take it in for a checkup so that you can decide whether or not it’s a necessary fix right now?

 

The fitness industry is the same. Most often, it pays to pay for the services of a good certified instructor and/or personal trainer. There are a lot of reasons for this, starting with the fact that most instructors do not decide they want to instruct as their first job. It is an extension of who they are and what they care about, and this can happen at any point in their life.

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Secondly, instructors spend months–yes, years!–training in order to be competent and qualified to meet your fitness needs. They also spend a lot of money to get that training. In the mind-body industry, yoga and Pilates certifications cost on average between $2,500 and $5,000 before travel expenses. In my own experience, I was fortunate to have the MyCAA military spouse scholarship to help me earn my 200-RYT, but I still shelled out about $3000 for hotel and flights because I was trying to get my certification finished before I had my first daughter. (I ended up having to postpone the last two classes I needed till after her birth because the conference I was trying to attend had sold out.)

 

Then there are the hours they spend creating your fitness regimens each week. You might only see them a hour a week but often they spend several more developing your next workout(s), researching and practicing each movement so that you are being trained with the utmost competence. Let’s look at a quick example. Let’s say you pay $30/session for a personal trainer. You see them once a week for an hour, but they spend an additional two hours creating your workout. That averages out to $10/hour, which is not even minimum wage in some areas. And this is before you average all the money they spend to earn their certifications, maintain them each year with continuing education, keep liability insurance and any other insurance they need for their business, equipment, travel and food expenses, clothing, and other professional fees and services they may implement to help promote their business.

 

It sounds like a lot, and it can be, but fitness professionals like getting the best up-to-date education possible so that you, the customer, is taken care of to the best of our abilities. It is always worth having an initial interview with your future trainer or instructor in order to make sure you both jive and understand what each is bringing to the table. Because, when it comes down to it, as an instructor I want to know what you want and need so that I can best serve you!

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If something feels off to either party, it may be best to keep searching until you find the person that is right for you. Because, first and foremost, fitness is a preventative measure against chronic disease, and then a remedy to help you improve and even heal from it. It takes a team to help you achieve your fitness goals: your doctors and therapists (or any professional you may be working with), your fitness instructor, and–most importantly–you.

 

Yes, without your commitment to yourself, we don’t have a client and, therefore, a job, and that is why your input is so valuable to us as instructors. You are the reason why we spend so much on training and other professional fees. You are that important!

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