Found on Facebook

Found on Facebook

Somehow last week ran away from me before I had a chance to even think about blogging! I got to Saturday and realized that everything I’d meant to do didn’t happen…except housework. So I suppose I did something productive.

 

Well, I’ll get to last week’s topic next week, but in the meantime, I hope that the temperatures are starting to dip for you. We’re expecting 100 F today, which I’m totally bummed about. Fall comes around to everywhere but us, and I really, really want some cool temperatures to help me feel less pregnant. Ah well. This weekend might find me a 80’s-degree day. Fingers crossed!

 

Check out these amazing articles and recipes below. We’re heading into cold and flu season, so make sure you check out the very last recipe on Fire Cider. It sounds like a real cold-kicker. If you’re looking for another way to fight colds in your family, consider doTERRA’s OnGuard essential oil blend, found here. I gave it to my hubby to fight off a head cold and he felt better in 24 hours!

 

Articles

Warm Up By Rolling Out

6 Lower Body Exercises Besides Squats

Build Strong Glutes and Pain-free Lower Back

Kettlebell Training Kicks Butt (study)

Posterior Chain Workout

Improve Stability and Mobility (Functional Training Exercises)

Improving Chronic Neck Pain w/Pilates

Yoga on the Ball

Have We Gotten Carried Away with HIIT?

6 Signs It’s Time to Change Your Workout

Sorting Out Supplements

A Happy Spouse is Good for Your Health

Vegetarian Diets are Also Good for the Planet

Food Safety Tips

Buy Ugly Produce, Reduce Food Waste

How to Train Your Brain to Like Healthier Foods

Fire Up Your Metabolism

5 Habits that Increase Longevity

Your Thoughts are Key to Your Health

 

Recipes

Roasted Figs and Plums

Pumpkin Granola Bars w/Chocolate Chunks and Apricots (nut-free)

Loaded Morning Museli

Raspberry Cacao Nib Breakfast Bundt Cakes (grain-free)

Honey Peach Muffins w/Oat Streusel Topping

Sandwich Bread (Paleo, grain- and nut-free)

Pesto Cheese Bread

Easy Cheesy Baked Tortellini

Caprese Pizza

Mini Pizza Frittata Bites (Paleo)

Pumpkin Cinnamon Cookies

Creamy Chocolate Ice Cream (refined sugar and dairy-free)

Homemade Granulated Garlic

Fire Cider

I apologize for not putting out a post last week. I got clobbered with a sinus cold, which on top of being (seemingly) perpetually sick (again) this pregnancy and a teething infant will knock anyone flat on their back. However, through the use of essential oils (lemon, peppermint, and ginger mainly), I managed to defeat the crud after 4 days. Had I been able to use doTERRA’s protective blend, OnGuard, it might have been sooner, but there are certain oils one has to avoid while pregnant and some of those are in it.

 

But I’m back with this month’s doTERRA specials:

 

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Feel free to visit my website for more information on these products, and always feel free to shoot me a message with any questions you might have on products, preferred memberships, and becoming an wellness advocate!

 

And now onward….

 

Since my daughter was six months, I’ve introduced solid foods to her. Like many parents, I’d done some research about which way I wanted to go. I was really interested in baby-led weaning (BLW) but honestly had no idea where to begin to find good resources on the subject, and I didn’t know which of my friends were using that method of introduction. So I went with spoon-feeding purees.

 

It has been a frustrating experience, honestly. I initially went all out, making purees from fruits and veggies and trying to stuff them in her, with the occasional dose of yogurt added. Some things she liked right away. Many of them she’d tolerate. But in the end, almost all of them she spit back out, especially when her interest for what mama and daddy were eating grew.

 

So I began hand-feeding her bits of whatever I felt was nutritious for her with, again, varying results. Most meals, I felt frustrated. So did my daughter, I think, because she wanted to do it herself.

 

Now children are hardwired to learn how to do things from the time they’re born–rolling to sitting to crawling to walking–and while they need some help sometimes from the parents, the learning curve is largely left up to how fast they’re going to figure it out and do it. So it’s rather backwards of parents to seize control of the eating part of this learning process by dictating what foods their kids should eat (at this stage). Okay, in general we do know what is nutritious…but so do babies, and they know exactly what they need when. Trust me. Blueberries are packed with good things for you but if a baby doesn’t want to eat them, they won’t no matter how hard you try.

 

Linked to Amazon

Linked to Amazon

Enter Baby-Led Weaning: The Essential Guide to Introducing Solid Foods and Helping Your Baby to Grow Up a Happy and Confident Eater, by Gill Rapley and Tracey Murkett. I was introduced to this book a few months ago by a friend who announced that this would be her basic BLW guide as she began introducing solids to her son (though I didn’t purchase it till the beginning of this month). I was thrilled to know someone else who was planning on BLW and picked her brain about the best way to go through with it now that I’d started solids.

 

Let me stop here a moment to define what BLW is not. Weaning, as used here, is a British term for introducing foods to a baby, whereas in America it is used to describe the process of stopping breastfeeding. BLW is not about reducing breast milk to your child, which has many essential antibodies and benefits for them (even through the age of 2), but rather about teaching them how to eat good, nutritious food.

 

What is BLW? Basically, it’s putting a variety of foods before your baby and letting them examine them to their heart’s content till they are ready to try tasting them…and then letting them gum/chew the food till they figure out the mechanics of eating. This whole process, according to Rapley/Murkett, is akin to playing–and who wouldn’t want their kid to enjoy meal time?

 

There is a reduced risk of choking, according to Rapley/Murkett, because when babies first start learning how to eat, they still have their tongue reflex, an automatic mechanism that pushes away objects that threaten to go down their throat. At around six months, this begins to lessen/stop. The problem with purees and spoon-feeding, apparently, is that the foods are runny enough to bypass this safety reflex and the baby merely sucks food off a spoon, so when chunkier foods are introduced, they can often choke on chunks as they haven’t yet figured out how to chew.

 

This being said, I’ve got to admit that it is a messier way to do meal time. Rapley/Murkett offer some good suggestions for reducing mess, but until an infant learns how to keep food in their mouth, chew and swallow it, there is mess involved. On the upside of things, however, the messy stage is rather short-lived and accompanied by the necessary learning of the mechanics of the hands, mouth, and utensils (when introduced). Many BLW children are able to feed themselves well with utensils by 18-24 months–there are pictures in the book to prove it.

 

I’m really interested in seeing my daughter progress. Already, I feel like she’s eating more than she was before, even if half of the apple pulp comes back out 🙂 I’m hoping that BLW’s promise of infants being more adventurous eaters will happen soon, too, and am in the process of looking for easy-to-use/-wash dishware and utensils to help her practice! I will, as usual, do a follow up post at a later date. Until then, happy eating!