The Bodymind, Part I

April 18, 2013

Linked to Amazon page

Linked to Amazon page

Currently, I’m reading a book called Your Body Speaks Your Mind by Deb Shapiro. In it, she introduced a term (to me) called the Bodymind. Now, I teach mind-body exercise, and we discuss the link between the mind and the body and how important it is; but this was the first time I’ve personally heard of the Bodymind. At this point, I’m still learning what she’s referring to but at this point, the connection that I’ve understood is this: everything that transpires in your brain produces neuropeptides, which are then stored in various parts of your body, and neuropeptides are a part of your enteric parasympathetic system, which is connected to the belly and is considered the “second brain” of the body.

I will tell you more about the book–I might even do a review–once I’ve finished it, but so far it’s fascinating. What I can say about this topic thus far is that from what I understand according to Ayurveda and other eastern traditional medicines, all disease and illness starts in the brain. It may not be the sole thing responsible for disease and illness. Indeed, environmental and other such factors do play a role in them. However, from what I’ve observed from people who have held onto old feelings–they might not even know it too–the repression has attributed to their ailments.

Again, more on that at a later date.

In the meantime, it behooves us all to take a look at our own lives and notice where we are holding onto repressed pain, anger, helplessness, etc., and the potential effects these have on our health.

For example, a student of mine has been concerned about thyroid issues because they run in her family and she hasn’t been feeling well lately. I mentioned this book to her, and we were discussing the Bodymind, and it suddenly struck me that her father had died a year ago and that she might actually be feeling unwell because of the emotions she might not be recognizing. It gave her pause, and reading Shapiro’s work has given me pause too, for I’m the type to want to walk what I talk instead of just hand out some good advice. That is what every good teacher (in any subject) has done: lead by example.

I look forward to revisiting this topic at a future point in time!

***

On a personal note, I’m off to continue my yoga training, so this post is briefer than normal. I hope you have a wonderful week! Continue to reach toward your health and wellness goals, and remember that it takes more time and patience than we originally think to achieve them. Determination and persistence win the day.

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6 Responses to “The Bodymind, Part I”

  1. habisha said

    Good post and there’s a lot to this Bodymind thing. It also affects the spirit, but not sure how you get that in there and where it connects in what you’re learning.

    Learning to let go of past hurts and pains, to reach for peace and healing is enormously essential. When someone has been hugely hurt, it’s hard for them to let go and move on, but when they do, they often feel lighter inside; they’re more active, so they lose weight, they are more social. There are many benefits.

    Finding the right person to talk with is a key, as is being willing to acknowledge and grieve the pain (whatever it is) and losses.

    Living freer is a wonderful thing. True freedom of spirit is the ultimate goal. How one gets there is the journey. Take joy in it, even the rocky parts.

    Hope you have a great week at Yoga training. I envy you in some ways, but I’m perfectly happy to be here, too.

    • Meredith Rose Ashe said

      Like I said, I’d only started reading the book. And as I said, I think you should read it too 🙂 It will make better sense when/if you do.

      • habisha said

        Will do when I have a chance. Right now I’m hardly getting a chance to think. Things should settle down in a couple weeks and then we’ll try to get it.

  2. […] month, I introduced the bodymind as discussed in Deb Shapiro’s Your Body Speaks Your Mind. The idea is based on the ancient […]

  3. […] Body Speaks Your Mind (Part I and Part II), and elsewhere, there is an idea in Eastern medicine that all disease starts in the […]

  4. […] As an added thought, I highly recommend both Shapiro’s Your Body Speaks Your Mind (Part 1, Part 2) and Robertson’s Natural Prozac: Learning to Release Your Body’s Own […]

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