I’ve been documenting my cloth diapering experience here because I think it’s important for moms to realize that it’s doable. And more than doable, it’s easy. With water usage becoming more of an issue, it is also environmentally friendly because cloth diapers use less water when washed than companies do when making their disposables.

Yes, there is an initial cost involved when considering cloth diapering your child, but that investment goes a long way toward subsequent children. For instance, for my first child I paid about $700 for my cloth stash (over the majority of my pregnancy, so $50-100 a month); add laundry detergent for a year and I’m probably looking at about $800 for the first year of diapering one child. That’s really not that bad for someone who wants to test all the diapers!

For my second, I probably spent around $500 for an initial stash, and a good bit of that went toward newborn and Size 1 diapers because I didn’t want to have to change her as often at night. (That was a rough learning experience with my first.) The great thing is that now that my first is getting closer to potty training and is using fewer diapers throughout the day, I have more that I can use between the two of them as my second grows into the originals I purchased for my first.

So, to calculate my expenses: for two in the first 20 months of cloth diapering, I’ve probably spent $1400 (this includes laundry detergent, bum butter, sprays, Snappis, reusable liners, and of course diapers). Not bad considering that the average costs for using disposables on one child in their diaper-wearing years is $1500-$2500. And, honestly, I think I’ll be spending less with each year to come!

There is some talk among cloth diapering mamas about stashes. Should you have a stash for each or share. My call: go by your budget. When it comes down to it, you really don’t need a stash for each. It’s just nice to know that you’ve got enough for each in case you run low.

The only thing I’ve noticed a change with two in cloth is how often I have to do the laundry. Once every two days. Honestly, though, it’s not that bad. My loads are smaller than they were and they’re getting cleaner since they don’t sit 3+ days anymore. Plus, hubby made me a clothes drying rack so I can take advantage of all the sunshine we get in the desert! It’s been superb to have sun-bleached diapers instead of stains. They are stiff when I take them in, but a quick tumble in the dryer helps with softening them up.

Other than that, I’ve not had any more stress when it comes to cloth diapering two under two. It’s rather amusing sometimes, actually. My first often makes yuck noises when I’m changing her sister! But thank goodness she knows when diapers are dirty. It means she’s getting closer to potty training–and that will be a fun experience of its own.

So I’ve been trying to get to this blog for a couple weeks and it just hasn’t happened. Why? Because I started selling Jamberry Nails at the beginning of the month, so in addition to two under two, I’ve been giving myself a crash course between online parties!

toxic fiveAs a rule, I don’t buy just anything. I”m not huge into selling because there’s so much cheap and toxic stuff out there, particularly in the beauty department. In fact, over the past few years, I’ve gotten away from store-bought beauty products altogether. I hardly ever wear makeup, and I never get to a nail salon anymore for pedicures. The two or three times I’ve gone in the past two years have been less than wonderful experiences; last time, the nail tech gouged the instep of my foot with a cheap, substandard callous file. The mark is almost healed.

About 7 years ago, I heard a news report about how the toxic chemicals in nail polish actually shortened the nail techs’ lives by something like 7 years. (Here’s a good article on the effects of inhalation of nail polish chemicals on their health.) This was before Jamberry had been founded, but it made me begin thinking about the terrible stuff that fills so many beauty products, be it nail polish or makeup. It’s been a long road of research (the Environmental Working Group is a great starting point for those interested in learning what’s in their beauty products), but I”m finally pulling it together. (I’ll talk more about how aromatherapy and essential oils play into this in a future post.)

what jamberry doesnt haveOne of the amazing twists in life is that good things often fall into your lap. I’d never heard of Jamberry until I was invited to a Facebook party last fall. It was instant love! Here was an answer to my concerns about the stink (I absolutely hate the smell of polish) and the chemicals, and I could do my own nails at home rather than try and find time in my hectic schedule to get to a salon without the constant nagging worries of what is going on with my children. (Queue heavenly music.) What mom doesn’t want a few less worries, and a few more minutes for herself?

Several facts made me decide to join as a consultant, was several facts: they’re budget-friendly, user-friendly (including kid-friendly), allergen-free (from what I can tell, anyway) and non-toxic, not to mention cruelty-free and made in the USA. The clencher actually was their salon-quality nail lacquers, which are five-free rather than the usual three-free. Their nail wraps are terrific, beautiful, and full of persoNAILity, but the attention to details like the reduction of chemical exposure is very important to me.

The toxins in our environment are one of, if not the biggest, risk factors for developing cancer. The more we can reduce the amount we’re exposed to, the better. What is so sad is that the beauty industry promotes a lot of products that make us look good but are full of nasty toxins. We plaster them on our skin, our biggest organ, which absorbs what is slathered onto it. If I can bring awareness to others in order to help them reduce exposure to toxins, in addition to stress reduction, I think I’ve done my job well.

***

Author note: I have linked up my website, and do receive commissions from any sales placed through it. If you have any questions about Jamberry’s products, or hosting or consultant opportunities, please feel free to email me at hothandsfabfeet@gmail.com. Please also note that I do not actively promote through my blog posts. Any mention of my business is directly linked to topics that are health and fitness related in an effort to create awareness and promote a better quality of life for others.

April Fools! No, not really. I meant to get this post up last week, but it didn’t quite happen. I ended up giving birth instead! We have a second beautiful little girl whose bringing much joy to her entire family.

I plan on taking the month of April off from blogging so I can get used to the changes two children under two bring to one’s life. (However, I do plan on putting up an April articles/recipes post at some point so I don’t have an overflowing email account, haha.) In the meantime, I hope you are doing well and enjoy what this blog has to offer. Until May, then: May Spring rains bring you beautiful flowers!

Articles

5 Compound Moves for Your Workout

8 Creative Ways to Use a Medicine Ball

No Equipment Needed Workout

Functional Strength Training Combos

TRX for Mobility and Flexibility

CrossFit Study

Maximize HIIT with Metabolic Strength Conditioning

7 Signs You May Be Overtraining

5 Tips for Weight Training for Weight Loss

Pre- and Post-workout Nutrition for HIIT

Food Labeling and Your Health

You May Live Longer Eating and Mediterranean Diet (Study)

Wake Up Your Glutes

Menopause and Mind-body Fitness

How Upward-facing Dog and Cobra Differ

Tennis Ball Techniques for Tight Muscles

Homemade Cheek Tint

Gelatin Hair Mask

Recipes

Maple Pumpkin Scones (gluten-free, vegan)

Asparagus, Goat Cheese, and Pistachio Flat Bread

Curried Pumpkin Stew

Cabbage Slaw with Cilantro Lime Dressing

Smashed Chickpea, Avocado, and Pesto Salad

Strawberry Spinach Salad with Avocado, Goat Cheese, and Candied Pistachios

Roasted Mushroom, Kale, and Goat Cheese Tacos

Lemon Curd Cupcakes

Passover Lemon Coconut Macaroons (gluten-free, vegan)

***

I’ve also added April’s doTERRA specials! Please feel free to visit my website if you are interested in anything, and as always, feel free to ask questions. There are quite a number of new products that have been rolled out in the past few weeks. Check them out!

Extended through April 15!

Extended through April 15! Deep Blue is an excellent way to reduce aches and pains.

Melaleuca (tea tree) oil is fantastic for treating the skin; and DigestZen Blend is great for balancing gut health.

Melaleuca (tea tree) oil is fantastic for treating the skin; and DigestZen Blend is great for balancing gut health.

Last week slipped away from me as follows: WE FINALLY GOT OUR TAX REFUND, SO NOW I CAN BUY CLOTH DIAPERS AND NURSING TANKS–AND, OH, IT’S GETTING HOT, HOT, HOT OUTSIDE AND MY DAUGHTER DOESN’T HAVE ANY SUMMER CLOTHES FOR HER SIZE, SO WE NEED SOME OF THOSE TOO! Needless to say, with my head swimming with baby and toddler needs, I didn’t get this post out, but as I’ve had several pregnant women in my classes come up to me asking about my experience with natural childbirth and any advice I can give them, I thought I’d pass along the information here.

Please note: I’m not a medical practitioner. All of the advice that follows merely comes from my own experience. Seek a qualified medical practitioner to answer any and all your questions with regards to your health care options.

Almost all mothers, particularly first-time mothers, have fears. Many of these are related to the pain, or perceived pain, that you’ll encounter while giving birth. Make no mistakes–I’m not going to lie–giving birth to a child hurtsA lot. Underline that at least three times.

With that said, here are the four main points I tell mothers interested in going a natural route for childbirth:

  • Trust your body: it knows what it’s doing. The key is to keep your head when the going starts getting rough.
  • It’s a mind game: in order to achieve that natural birth plan, you’ve got to be mentally prepared to override your impulses for pain-relief. You’ve got to be tougher mentally than the contractions that can–and do–make you cry.
  • Breathe: practicing yoga breathing (slow, steady breaths) is one of the best ways to help your body relax as you’re going through contractions. You can also look to see if there are birthing classes in your area for breathing tips and techniques. Relaxation is key to a successful natural birth.
  • Go with the flow: stuff happens. All our perfectly laid-out plans don’t always go accordingly, and sometimes we’re totally thrown off by the sudden need for medical intervention. Don’t beat yourself up because your drug-free plans went awry. It’s better than you and baby are safe (via a c-section, etc.) than risk further complications and your lives.

One final thought I’ll touch upon before I wrap up. Make sure that you’ve got a good “team” or support person with you while you go through the birthing process. My husband was fantastic. He jumped right in, did what the nurses and midwife instructed him to do without batting an eyelash. They were even cracking jokes!

Not all men are like that. We know families whose guys were squeamish, and that just creates more stress than a mother in the middle of childbirth needs. Seek someone else (a parent or friend) or hire a doula (birthing coach) to help you if your significant other can’t or won’t be there for you physically, emotionally, etc.

Most importantly, make sure that you are completely comfortable with how your doctor will be delivering your child(ren). If you aren’t, I suggest finding someone you’ll like well, or even love. Even with all our amazing technological advances in medicine today, childbirth is still a risky business as well as being a very personal experience. The fewer worries you have going into the birthing process, the more you’ll be able to put your game face on, concentrate on having baby, and celebrating the life that’s coming to rest in your arms.

There are a lot of opinions out there on how to use essential oils (EO’s). So many, in fact, that it can leave you scratching your head wondering what way to go. Companies like doTERRA, for whom I sell, claim that many of their products can be applied directly to the skin without dilution, or neat; those that are considered “hot” need a carrier oil like fractionated coconut oil. On the other side of the coin, many aromatherapists state that essential oils are such strong compounds that you should always diffuse them and/or use them with carrier oils. Then there are the age ranges, like how and when and how much to use on young children.

Truth be told, it gets overwhelming!

Even though I represent doTERRA, I fall on the side of caution for several reasons: 1) scientific research, while being done, isn’t finished yet on many/most EO’s; 2) diffusion/dilution of EO’s reduces the risks of sensitivity reactions and/or sensitization; 3) there’s a lot of reading I need to do on the various EO’s genotypes and any safety concerns that go along with them; 4) I typically believe in the less-is-more approach. Even Modern Essentials, the reference book many doTERRA wellness advocates regularly consult, suggests diffusion/dilution for a good many of the oils listed, and to not use any oil (except, perhaps, lavender) on children under the age of 6 neat, or even at all.

Then, for many of us who use Dr. Google to find out more information on a particular topic of choice, there are the internal disagreements in the EO community, both between traditional aromatherapists and corporations, and between corporation and corporation. I’m not one to bash any company or way of using EO’s. I merely promote doing your own research. Therefore, I’ve dug around and come up with a starter list of good places to go when you want to know more (regardless of any company affiliation):

  • Using Essential Oils Safely (Facebook group): where education is the primary focus, not sales or support of brands, and moderated by a group of trained aromatherapists who, in my opinion, give good advice on EO use. They also have a list of good websites to go to for more EO information under their files.
  • Learning about EOs: a website run by an aromatherapist trained through AromaHead Institute, one of the leading aromatherapy schools in the USA.
  • The Tisserand Institute: Robert Tisserand is, perhaps, the foremost expert on EO’s, their constituents, their uses, and their safety concerns. He also sends out a newsletter, to which you can subscribe, and also wrote Essential Oil Safety, a huge compendium of his lifelong research in the field.
  • Essential Oil Blogging: run by Plant Therapy, a company that I’ve heard recently began working with Tisserand, and whose blog is extremely friendly for those who aren’t into scientific terminology.

I’ve deliberately stayed away from websites linked to big corporations, like doTERRA and Young Living, merely because my primary goal here is to educate rather than sell (though I do list the monthly promotions in each month’s EO blog post), and because there is a lot of contention between companies that, frankly, I’d rather not get into as it makes my head spin. I think that the EO community is better off with good, solid information from non-biased sources (or as non-biased as I can find currently) rather than any propaganda aimed at undermining a competitor. Where you go to purchase quality therapeutic-grade oils is entirely up to you, as each person will swear by what works for them–and what works for them isn’t necessarily what will work for others. (DoTERRA has worked well for me, which is why I chose to become a wellness advocate in addition to how they source their oils and work to give back to the distillation communities. Likewise, a friend of mine swears by her Young Living oils. It all comes down to personal preference and what works for you.)

So how do you use EO’s safely?

  • Read the Latin name of the oil being used–this is really important so you aren’t using the wrong type of, say, lavender.
  • Check out material safety data sheets, if available, or another source (like Tisserand) to find out what safety concerns there are.
  • When in doubt, dilute, diffuse, or avoid all together.
  • Always consult your physician before starting a new regimen (even an EO regimen) and/or an aromatherapist for details on EO’s that will benefit you.

The biggest part of using EO’s safely is to read, read, read, and talk with those who have experience in the field. If you aren’t certain that the information you received from a company sales rep is accurate, look for good, non-biased EO sources that can just focus on what EO’s and their blends are about without regard to brand name and the bottom line. In my own personal experience, the more I research, the more I am considering becoming a certified aromatherapist so that I know what I’m selling better in order to give the very best advice to those seeking to use EO’s.

For those who are interested, there are many good aromatherapy training options out there. Check out the Alliance of International Aromatherapists and the National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy for lists of approved schools. Those that cross over in both lists are, it seems, the most highly recommended.

See more on EO’s here and here.

Speaking of how doTERRA sources, here is a spotlight on the process they go through on sourcing their lemon and bergamot essential oils in addition to a closer look at lemon oil.

March 2015 Specials

Visit www.mydoterra.com/leahrnovak for more information

Visit http://www.mydoterra.com/leahrnovak for more information

Visit www.mydoterra.com/leahrnovak for more information

Visit http://www.mydoterra.com/leahrnovak for more information

I’m about four weeks out from my delivery date with Bumpkin 2, which means a lot of waiting and taking care of last minute things. I honestly can’t wait for the pregnancy part to be over :) Until then, however, I’m trudging on and wanted to leave you with some health and fitness articles and recipes for you to try! Enjoy, and hope your March is nicer than your February. (I know a lot of you have been slammed with snow!)

Articles

The Essential Link Between Emotional Intelligence and Behavioral Change

Lack of Exercise Deadlier than Obesity?

All About Overtraining

Targeted Training vs. Functional Fitness

4 Core Movements for Beginners

Increase Mobility/Strength with This Bodyweight Circuit

A Beginner’s Guide to Yoga: 5 Widely Practiced Poses

Yoga Beginner Series (Part III)

Prenatal Gentle Flow (yoga)

Vets and Chronic Pain

How to Fall in Love with Whole Foods

Clash of the Food Titans

Flavonoids for Healthy Aging

Artificial Sweeteners and Gut Microbiota

Aromatherapy for Muscle Tension: Make an Inhaler

DIY Mustard Bath

7 Ways to Remove Toxins From Your Life

Recipes

4 Green Smoothies to Kick-start the Day

Italian Hot Chocolate

Banana Pancakes

Yeasted Belgian Waffles

Homemade Greek Yogurt

Herb-roasted Chicken with Herb-infused Gravy

Flourless Almond Butter Chocolate Chip Cookies

Homemade Samoas (grain-free)

Orange Poppyseed Bundt Cakes (grain-, nut-free, Paleo)

24 Rhubarb Recipes

I’m a part of a few Facebook mom groups, and sometimes I come across posts that I find rather humorous. Not because I think the mom posing the question lacks common sense or a knowledge base. Rather, I smile because I had the same thoughts as these things happened to me for the first time.

I’ll start by saying that you can (most often) blame your hormones for the random things that happen to you after you have your baby. Just as everything gets wacky while you’re pregnant, things go a little crazy again as your body returns to it’s pre-pregnancy self. As levels of estrogen and progesterone readjust to a (perhaps, new) baseline, you start pondering what the heck is happening to your body. Here are some postpartum (PP) phenomena, my own thoughts when I went through them, and how to handle any/all hurtles.

Breastfeeding: for mamas who are going to breastfeed, the first 2-4 weeks (sometimes longer) are a real roller coaster ride. Your breasts swell. You hurt in ways you’ve never hurt before. You’re tired from round-the-clock feedings. You’re wondering if baby ever gets enough. You’re wondering if you can really tolerate baby latching one more time.

The good news is that it gets easier. The not-so-good news is that it takes some time. You and baby have got to work as a team to figure out how best to breastfeed. You may really need some outside help too. Never hesitate to contact your family doctor/pediatrician and/or lactation consultant (LC), and consider joining your local La Leche League, International, chapter. Most often, you’ll find a ton of support through these channels, which will give you a morale boost and the courage you need to continue.

On one side note, there still are a lot of doctors out there who recommend, or even push, supplementation when you come in with questions and/or for checkups. Virtually all women make enough milk to sustain their children (I think it’s less than 2% don’t and/or cannot produce enough breast milk). This, however, doesn’t mean that your supply can’t dwindle or dry up sooner than later–another reason to get into contact with good LC’s, who can recommend safe foods for boosting milk supply. If your doctor recommends supplementation right off the bat, consider seeking a second opinion before making a final decision. I know I didn’t have any issues with milk supply; I also know that one of my girlfriend’s did about four months PP, and needed to supplement her baby’s diet so he’d gain weight. In the end, you’re mom. You know what’s best for your baby. Go with your gut.

The jiggle: one of the most common posts I see come from women ready to reclaim their pre-pregnancy body. They’ve got baby pudge and, six weeks PP, they want it gone! Now!

Let me start off by stating that it took almost 10 months for you to grow a baby. It’s going to take you at least that much time to have your body go back to it’s pre-pregnancy self. (It may never go back totally, but more on that in a second.) That doesn’t mean don’t start back up with your exercise and/or diet routines after your six-week PP checkup. It does mean take it easy, gradually ease into your routines again, seeking advice on diet if you’re breastfeeding so your supply doesn’t diminish, and on exercise if you’re still feeling aches and pangs in certain areas of your body. Note what makes you feel discomfort, and pay particular attention to anatomical alignment and how to perform the exercise properly. I know that when I moved into side plank a certain way, I’d feel a terrible pain in my pelvis, so I made sure that I didn’t transition into that particular exercise in that particular way again for at least six months.

Let me reiterate: take your time. You’ll thank yourself later.

Diastasis recti: some women experience a separation in their abdominal muscles (the rectus) after having a baby. If you do experience this,, seek guidance from your healthcare provider before returning to your exercise regimen. As nice as it’d be to crunch your way to a flat belly, that may actually make the separation worse rather than better.

Symphysis pubic dysfunction (SPD): the same advice applies to SPD. Because the hormone relaxin works so nicely to make your ligaments stretch so you can push baby through the birth canal, sometimes it takes a long while for things to line up properly again. Sometimes, you need to go through physical therapy. Seek medical advice if you find yourself having discomfort or pain in your pelvic/pubic region, even if you’ve had your six-week PP checkup.

The pants dance: yep. It happens. As much as we jump, dance, squirm, kick our legs, lie back on the bed, our pants might not fit. Ever again. You might have to go shopping (gasp!) for new ones. It might also just take more time for your hips to realign to their PP positions (or close to them). A lot of women’s hips change shape after they have babies. It’s natural, and will making having subsequent children much easier. Don’t fret about it. Embrace your new curves and celebrate the life you’re now holding in your arms!

Holy hairballs: around 3 months, all that luscious hair you grew while pregnant will start falling out by the handful, particularly around your temples. It will eventually stop (in time for your little one to start pulling it out by the fistful), but I still remember feeling aghast at how much I lost.

I’m sure there are more things I’ve overlooked. Each woman experiences pregnancy and postpartum life differently. When in doubt, talk with your doctor, pediatrician, LC, or another professional. Mom blogs can be great and make us feel good (or bad), but it’s always wise to get advice from all sides of the spectrum in order to make the best-informed decisions for ourselves and our children.

Every year, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) puts out a list on the top 12 foods you ought to purchase organically, and the Clean 15 you can pick up in the grocery store (and properly wash and prep once you get home). While the organization isn’t the end all, be all of research into the harmful affects of chemicals, they are committed to bringing you, the consumer, the latest research being done and what is happening in Washington, D.C. with regards to appropriate food labeling…or lack thereof.

In the most recent IDEA/ACE Fitness Journal (February 2015), it was announced that the EWG has recently come out with a Food Additives Dirty Dozen. In their press release, one of their senior scientists stated that while not all food additives are cause for concern, those found on this list are good to identify, especially (the article includes) since so many of them are restricted and/or banned in other countries. The list includes chemicals like nitrates/nitrites, potassium bromate, and propyl paraben. (The full list is linked above.)

While browsing their latest research page, I also discovered a Dirty Dozen Endocrine Disruptors list that I thought I’d post along with the others. While BPA is possibly the most well-known on the list due to its risks highlighted associated with plastics (mainly, but also canned goods) in the last several years, others, like phthalates, are also good to keep in mind when out shopping not only for food but also for health/beauty products. Again, the full list is posted above.

Last month, I discussed what essential oils are. This month, I wanted to briefly touch on why you might consider using them. Before I do, I’d like to reiterate what I’ve said many times before:

I’m not a doctor, and therefore I cannot diagnose, treat, cure, and/or prevent any disease. My intention is to discuss ways in which you may be able to help maintain wellness and quality of life. Since essential oils are considered supplements by the FDA, companies and sales representatives cannot claim that oils treat specific conditions/diseases/illnesses, nor should they. Always consult your physician, dietitian, naturopath, etc., before starting to use any new supplement or regimen, including essential oils.

One of the main reasons people are attracted by essential oils (EO’s) is because numerous medical studies have found that they have antiviral, antibacterial, antimicrobial, antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, and antibiotic properties. (Check out PubMed and Aroma Science for specific studies on EO’s, including this month’s spotlight oil, lavender.) They work on your physiology, at the cellular level, which is why so many people recommend them and why so many researchers are looking into EO’s for potential medical benefits. This is also why you want to look for therapeutic-grade essential oils and steer clear of most brands that are sold in conventional retail stores.

EO’s have hundreds of uses, including as bug repellent, anxiety reducers, air purifiers, and flavors in cooking. It is always best to get guidance when starting to use EO’s. If you have one near you, consulting a naturopath physician or aromatherapist is the best route to go–they have undergone the education necessary to understanding the chemical compositions of EO’s and how the act/react with one another and in the body under certain conditions. However, sometimes these resources are cost prohibitive. Therefore, in addition to websites like PubMed and Aroma Science, you might check out the following resources:

There are several good blogs out there; the one I’ve started following the one written by Andrea Butje of the Aromahead Institute, who incidentally is having free webinars on the AI’s aromatherapy course. There are also several Facebook groups out there advocating the safe use of EO’s, including Using Essential Oils Safely. Most of all, the more you research and learn, the more you’ll be able to use EO’s with safety and skill.

One final note before I finish. A lot of people recommend using EO’s on children, particularly lavender. Because they have such powerful properties, you should not use undiluted EO’s on children under the age of 6. If you chose to use an EO on their skin, it should be highly diluted (one drop in at least 2 Tbs. of a carrier oil, like fractionated coconut oil), but may be better and more safely utilized in a diffuser. EO’s should only be used on young children with purpose and possibly should be avoided on infants altogether. Again, always check with your pediatrician before using any EO’s on your children.

This Month’s Spotlight Oil: Lavender angustifolia

This Month’s doTERRA Deals:

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Please note, I am a doTERRA wellness advocate. While the main goal of these posts on EO’s is to educate, you can go to my website to purchase oils. I do earn a small commission from your purchases, and thank you for any business you send my way. I hope you find them as nice and useful and I have!

I hope this year has been a terrific one already. January is drawing to a close (already?!) but not before I leave you with this month’s articles and recipes. Enjoy them, and may you find many ways to apply them to your new lifestyle habits!

Articles

Yoga-inspired Dynamic Warm-up

20-minute Calorie-burning HIIT Workout

Little Black Dress Workout

Boost Your Workout with Metabolic Drills

Top Exercises to Gain Thoracic Mobility

Does Exercise Order Really Matter?

Diabetes and Exercise: What Every Fitness Professional Should Know

The Physiology of Fat Loss

Cold Winter Temps Trigger Brown Fat Burning

Improving Chronic Neck Pain with Pilates

Pilates and Chronic Lower Back Pain

Pilates for Larger Bodies

Sun Salutations Solutions

Seniors and Self-myofascial Release

Stretching for Men

Sleep: Fueling Brain and Body

Laughter, Brain Fitness, and Older Adults

The Skinny on Happiness

The Mental Aspects of Chronic Pain

Bust Out of a Food Rut

Eating with the Seasons

Understanding Iron-deficiency Anemia and Sports Anemia

From Farm to Doorstep with a Click

From Heirloom Seeds to Heirloom Breeds

How to Handle a Whole Chicken

DIY Cayenne/St. John’s Wort Salve

Natural Herbal Foot Care

The Wonders of Bergamot

Recipes

Avocado Toast

Banana Blueberry Muffins

On-the-go Breakfast Oatmeal Trail Mix Cupcakes

Baked Peanut Butter Apple Oatmeal

Meyer Lemon, Kale, and Goat Cheese Flatbread

Baked Mozzarella Sticks

Power Salad with Lemon Chia Seed Dressing

3 Ingredient Split Pea Soup (vegan)

Spaghetti and Olive Rosemary Meatballs (grain-free)

Goat Cheese Chicken Alfredo (gluten-free)

Slow Cooker Sweet Potato Chili (vegan)

Easy Chickpea Vegetable Stir Fry

Apple Berry Crumble (grain-free)

Mini-Carob Brownies (gluten-free)

Coconut Custard

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